Tis Pity He's a Writer

Richard Daybell – Novels, stories and short humor

Technology Is Running Amok

Apple’s iPhone5 went on sale last Friday and sold out within nanoseconds. It does wondrous things, I guess. It must, because 5 million people jumped right on it. It costs $649. We have a phone that’s attached to the wall. It lets you talk on it, that’s about all. We have a cellphone, too. I’m not sure what all it does. It must not do much. It cost $14.99. Chances are I’ll never buy an Apple iPhone5. Technologically, I’m pretty far behind the curve. To give you an example, here’s a piece I wrote back in the 90’s about my first fax. I know, people usually write about first loves, first cars and first jobs, but when you’re hopelessly behind the curve . . .

Fax Me the Pillow That You Dream On

Officially, it’s known as a facsimile communications machine. Those on more familiar terms with it call it a fax machine.

 I prefer facsimile communications — it’s formal, cold and aloof — just the way I would like our relationship to remain.

 Our relationship is new, and it’s more of a brief encounter. I recently, for the first time, sent a facsimile to someone. It’s worth noting that not only are a lot of people on a nickname basis with the thing, but they also have made a verb out of what was clearly intended to be a noun. It is important that every thinking person take a vow never, never to fax anything.

 I don’t know if that someone to whom I sent the facsimile ever received it, but I did send it. I did it; it’s over; I can get on with my life. It was this someone, of course, who instigated the whole thing, suggesting that this particular document needed to be rushed enough not to trust it to the vagaries of the postal service. I myself happen to be a fan of postal delivery. You stick something in an envelope, slap a stamp on it, and a few days later, a real human being, beaming with pride, delivers it to its destination. It’s easy, it’s fun and it’s environmentally friendly.

 After determining the location of the nearest facsimile communication device and preparing the document in question, I sat down with paper and pencil to list pros and cons, possible dangers inherent in the action, and penalties for lack of action. I could remain defiant — stick it in an envelope, slap a stamp on it, and let the chips fall where they may. That would have been a rational response, a consistent one, and the safe one. But as I prepared to lick the stamp, I noted that it portrayed tiny astronauts landing on a tiny moon. These brave explorers, these one-giant-leap-for-mankind heroes looked up at me as if to say “Wimp!”

 So even though I deeply distrust and avoid anything invented after 1967, I decided to go for it. It was a moment filled with emotional stress; breaking a technological barrier usually is. For those of you who have yet to screw up your courage and try it, I am happy to report that the anticipation is worse than the experience itself.

 I removed the document from its mailing envelope, unfolded it, and inserted it in the rather harmless looking machine (quicksand looks harmless, too). I picked up the receiver of a rather ordinary telephone, dialed my recipient’s number, and waited for my cue. The cue is an ear-shattering screech (just like, for those of you who remember the movie Fail Safe, the screech that came to the President of the United States over the hot line, indicating that our inadvertently launched nuclear missiles had reached the USSR, and Moscow was no more).

 Once the screech ends, you crawl out from under the desk, press a button, and the paper disappears into the machine. A minute later, it magically reappears. Presumably, the original has been divvied into millions of little molecules, each of which reproduces itself. The clones are then fed through the phone lines to be reassembled at the other end and the original is reassembled here. I don’t know. I do know the machine ironed the creases out of my document; I can vouch for nothing beyond that.

 I may never send a facsimile again (and I will not fax) but it was worth experiencing. It fills one with that same heady exhilaration that diving to the ocean floor or landing on the moon must. And even though I may never send a facsimile again, I’m seriously considering giving the electric can opener a try. Technology is running amok, and it’s sweeping me along with it.

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145 comments on “Technology Is Running Amok

  1. elroyjones
    September 24, 2012

    YOU are my hero. I was dead set against debit cards and I worked in a bank, credit cards same. I vowed NEVER to have a home computer, or a digital camera or anything but a two party rotary phone… .
    The road to hell is paved with good intentions.

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 24, 2012

      Or good inventions. I’m happy to hear you were dragged into the future. Two-party phones — wow, what a memory, listening in, of course. You shouldn’t have done that.

      Like

      • elroyjones
        September 25, 2012

        I will never rise above your expectations, at least you aren’t disappointed.

        The road to hell is paved with good inventions, wish I’d thought of that!

        Like

      • Delana
        September 25, 2012

        I remember when my dad had a party line. We would visit him and he would talk about not every being able to use his phone because of the teenagers in the other house always on the line. 😉

        Like

        • Richard Daybell
          September 25, 2012

          He didn’t tell you he was listening in, did he?

          Like

          • Delana
            September 25, 2012

            Knowing my dad, he probably told the teenagers to get a life…so that he could make a phone call.

            Like

  2. Mitzi Dunford
    September 24, 2012

    Sent from my iPhone

    Like

  3. Fay Moore
    September 25, 2012

    You are adorable. Thanks for the trip down memory lane. The hubby has an iPhone clone, provided by his employer. The damn thing lights up at night when I walk by it. It’s like the all-seeing eye in the night. Creepy. P.S. You’ve inspired a post. Thanks.

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      I don’t trust anything that lights up by itself. Especially at night. I’ve whacked a good number of night lights in self-defense. You might try that with the clone. Sort of like the old joke about making an obscene clone fall. It’s you or it. Be tough. I look forward to the post.

      Like

  4. WordPress Roger
    September 25, 2012

    Reblogged this on Roger Plaster's Blog and commented:
    Trying to use this new blog thing…

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      Thank you very much. This new blog thing leaves me scratching my head a lot.

      Like

      • pecsbowen
        September 25, 2012

        ur post n d folowing cmnts had me roflmao ( njy d pun wid d nw shrtfrms, luk vat it did 2 our englsh!)

        Like

  5. segmation
    September 25, 2012

    I like technology but boy it really has been fast. Can’t wait to get my new iPhone! Thanks for sharing. http://www.segmation.wordpress.com

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      As the Queen said to Alice: “Here, you see, it takes all the running you can do to keep in the same place.”

      Like

  6. halfbakedlog
    September 25, 2012

    I threw out my husband’s electric can opener right after we got married. It was dirty and a waste of space and electricity. I open all cans with a hand-operated opener which works well and cleans up easier. Some old technology surpasses the new.

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      Now you’ve got me started. I’m going to dig out my old typewriter. Thanks for the comment.

      Like

    • Delana
      September 25, 2012

      So true! I much prefer a hand-operated opener. I even went back to the very old hand-operated kind (the one you can buy for $1) because all the new hand-operated ones do not work for more than about 3 cans!

      Like

  7. Delana
    September 25, 2012

    I really enjoy your writing style. I smiled. I thought about my grandmother (when she was in her 60s) who was nervous about using a microwave (and then found she fully enjoyed it). She never did, however, start using a computer. My great aunt (also now 89 years old) has an e-reader, a Facebook acct., and comments on blogs. Yes, you are being swept along with technology, you are blogging… 🙂
    Blessings,
    Delana
    PS I wrote a blog post today about the importance of preparing the next generation for the technology that is/will be sweeping them away. http://theeducationcafe.wordpress.com/2012/09/25/teaching-technology/

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      Thank you. One should be nervous about using a microwave. I open and close it using a long stick.

      Like

    • Tom Domzalski
      September 26, 2012

      I know it’s all tongue-in-cheek but my aversion for the luddite population is immense. If you don’t want to use the tools available because you don’t see a value in them, cool…go with it. It’s critical to be able to see different ways of doing things, but technology is mainstreaming in many ways. And Delana, I read your blog linked above…a nice starting point but my expectations, as a high school teacher and technologist, for students today are vastly higher. Thanks for introducing the basics once again though.

      Like

      • Delana
        September 26, 2012

        I agree that it is critical to stay on the cutting edge. Tom, I would love to include a short article from you on The Education Cafe about your expectations for students today. Since a large part of my audience have children in national schools that are a bit behind the curve, getting parents to step up to at least the basics was my goal. However, I would love to include more challenges for parents and teachers. If you are interested in writing something for my blog, you can send it to stewinfo@pobox.com. Please include the subjects that you teach (and if desired, the school you teach for and its location).

        Like

      • Delana
        September 26, 2012

        Also, I just realized that since I had posted Teaching Technology by email, even though I had put the shortcode for comments, comments were not open. I have added your comment to the article and opened up the comments feature for others.

        Like

  8. rami ungar the writer
    September 25, 2012

    I’m still getting used to blogging! I’ve never even sent a fax in my life.

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      I’d suggest putting it pretty low on your bucket list.

      Like

    • Delana
      September 25, 2012

      I rarely send faxes. I prefer taking a digital picture of a document with my camera and sending it via email. It is much faster than the fax machine in our office!

      Like

      • rami ungar the writer
        September 25, 2012

        my phone doesn’t even take pictures, let alone connect to the internet!

        Like

        • Delana
          September 25, 2012

          My phone doesn’t take pictures either. I have an old digital camera that does. Then I put the camera card into my computer. Still faster than the fax machine! Wish I had a phone that took pictures…just can’t afford it yet. I think my phone cost $11. 😉

          Like

  9. bharatwrites
    September 25, 2012

    I’m distressed by noun-verb conversions. Thankfully, people will switch completely from fax to email, and this debate will become academic. But I’ll be honest, if some verbs make a sentence less bloated, I’m open. ‘Send a fax’ consumes less space than ‘fax’—not to mention everybody accepts that the verb ‘fax’ means ‘send a fax.’ I take it you don’t approve of the verb ’email’ either. That’s here to stay.
    I don’t think the iPhone 5 has anything ground-breaking, nor did the 4S. IMO iPhone’s magic topped out at retina display.
    Congrats on getting Freshly Pressed.

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      Thank you. As to email, I’m not sure I approve of it as either a noun or a verb.

      Like

    • thelyniezian
      October 2, 2012

      Actually the iPhone 5 has 4G capability if I’m correct, so if so it is slightly towards groundbreaking (not that other phones aren’t going to have the same capability before long, so that rather cancels it out.)

      Like

      • Richard Daybell
        October 2, 2012

        It would be less confusing if the iPhone 5 had 5G and so on.

        Like

        • thelyniezian
          October 2, 2012

          Sadly the network infrastructure doesn’t update as often as iPhone versions (which makes sense if you think about it- it’s a lot costlier to do so than updating a highly-portable consumer product).

          Like

  10. Cheryl Petersen
    September 25, 2012

    Good one. I don’t even own a cell phone and tell my children I am ahead of technology because I can send thoughts via divine Mind (spirituality with a sense of humor).

    Like

  11. notesfromrumbleycottage
    September 25, 2012

    Love this post although I have learned to embrace technology.

    Like

  12. Jeremy Truitt
    September 25, 2012

    I love the “looking back” thing. I also happen to agree with you, the technology is just horrendous and it keeps going! Who’d have thought 5 million people would sign up over a weekend to spend $649?!

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      Who would have? I guess I’ll go check to see how many people signed up to spend $2 on my book. I’d be happy with even one million.

      Like

      • Delana
        September 25, 2012

        If 1/4 million would buy my book, I’d be happy!

        Like

  13. Ivynettle
    September 25, 2012

    Technology is really running amok – even the fax machines! We recently got a new one at work (must be one of rather few computer-less businesses left – just a fax machine, landline phone and a calculator), and reading the manual, we discovered it will even print sudokus for you (and the solution).

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      Congratulations. You’ve discovered one of the few justifications for the thing.

      Like

    • L. Palmer
      September 25, 2012

      Whenever I use a fax machine, the first thing I want is Soduku…

      Like

  14. bluedeckshoe
    September 25, 2012

    Great post – you say that the postal service is environmentally friendly. Were you tacitly saying that fax machines are not? I have no science upon which to base it, but I would imagine a letter that has to travel across the country (by plane, train or truck) is going to have a higher carbon footprint than a fax.

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      Picky, picky, picky. I suppose you believe in global warming, too. Thank you for the comment.

      Like

  15. Sarah
    September 25, 2012

    We used to have one of those machines. I was certainly glad when it went out along with the pager. But some things are better left as they are – hand crank can openers being one of them, in my humble opinion. 😀 Great post. Congrats on being Freshly Pressed!

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      Thank you very much. I forgot all about pagers. They’re truly evil.

      Like

      • sqeekchair
        September 27, 2012

        “Pagers-” occupation: “drug dealer.” Anyone looking at said person could tell he/she was not fulfilling their hospital residency. Calling pagers allowed you to leave your contact number only, or certain “canned messages.” How primitive to think of it!

        Like

  16. Matt_S_Law
    September 25, 2012

    I’ve never understood the facsimile machine. The last time I kept trying and trying to send a document until they told me “stop, we received it.” How could you have received it? I still have the document right here! I’m slightly behind the tech-curve, but not quite at the “Zoolander” stage. 🙂 Great post!

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      At last, someone who’s even more behind the curve than me. Thank you.

      Like

  17. optymist
    September 25, 2012

    Strange, I’m a new blogger and my first post is about how a fax machine stymied my previous attempt at being an entrepreneur. I thought I was the only person who remembered them 🙂 Congrats on being pressed

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      Good post. Keep it up. We can all be happy that the king has been dethroned.

      Like

  18. pryan51
    September 25, 2012

    I tell my children about this amazing new technology of talking face to face! They are not amused….

    Like

  19. Shannon Pardoe
    September 25, 2012

    Wow! I have to say I really admire the way you right and the perspective you shine on technology. I can’t wait to take a look at your other posts.

    Like

  20. The Old Wolf
    September 25, 2012

    Congrats on the Freshly Pressed! I always love musings on technology. :d

    Like

  21. Magnolia
    September 25, 2012

    Hi Richard, great piece! We share similar views, I just wrote a pice on the same subject on my blog! http://lovsnmua.wordpress.com/. I really like the way you write “Technology is running amok, and it’s sweeping me along with it.”

    Like

  22. Jnana Hodson
    September 25, 2012

    Wait a bit. At least a few weeks. You know, for the next big tech marketing leap. By then you should be able to get a used iPhone5 even cheaper. On eBay, probably.
    There are advantages for staying at least one step behind the curve. Let them work the bugs out. Let the price drop sharply.
    Those of us who admit neo-Luddite tendencies need to sit down and commiserate. We could even have whine tastings. For instance, I hate carrying a cell phone. (OK, mine’s a TracFone.) I’m not a slave to any machine. It’s not on my person 24/7, or even 24/5. As far as I’m concerned, the only reason for having it at all is in case I hit a moose or another deer at midnight on the commute home. Leave it in the car, except when recharging.
    So, gee, it’s so refreshing to hear somebody still railing about faxes. I thought they became obsolete weeks ago.
    At least the lines at the post office are getting shorter.

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      Thank you, TracFone buddy. That’s what they’re for, reporting downed mooses.

      Like

  23. David
    September 25, 2012

    I’m still trying to do the math for how long it would take you to key in the fax numbers for the 40 people that liked your post and the 57 of us who commented!

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      If a technocrat like me could key in one number every two hours and a train was sixty miles away approaching at 87 miles an hour . . . well, as long as you’re doing math . . .

      Like

  24. the Jotter's Joint
    September 25, 2012

    I love “Fax Me the Pillow You Dream On.” Fun. But I am a tech girl. I have a 4S and am not in a hurry for 5. Congrats on Freshly Pressed. ~Gail

    Like

  25. zachbissett
    September 25, 2012

    The Exhilarating Memoirs of Fax Owner

    Like

  26. marymtf
    September 25, 2012

    I’ve written a piece myself on the issue of technology amocking, called ‘The iPhone.’ It’s a dead give away: those of us of a certain age tend to write about technology.My fear is for the future generation. I worry that they will prefer to bond with their machines than with each other.
    PS. If I had one I could never cuddle up with my fax machine or my can opener (I have a manual).
    PS 2. Congratulations on being freshly pressed.

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      Thanks, but have you ever really tried: Cuddle up and be my little can opener sweetie pie. And tell me more about that “manual.”

      Like

      • marymtf
        September 25, 2012

        I avoid manuals like the plague. 🙂

        Like

        • Richard Daybell
          September 25, 2012

          Automatics, huh?

          Like

          • marymtf
            September 26, 2012

            Picture me hanging my head in shame. I’ve turned into one of those old farts who begin every sentence with ‘in my day.’

            Like

  27. pezcita
    September 25, 2012

    Loved reading this! I guess if I went back in time a hundred years and had to explain fax and e-mail, I’d tell everybody they were a kind of space-age telegram. I like the Yellow Kid on your avatar by the way. I referenced him in my latest post 🙂

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 25, 2012

      Or for me, a space-age Pony Express. Thank you. The Yellow Kid is my hero; I’ll certainly check out that post.

      Like

  28. jithinjohny
    September 25, 2012

    technology is always on it’s rapid growth and the industry is behind it.the consequences is all reserved for public. na?

    Like

  29. theeverydaycyclist
    September 25, 2012

    Reblogged this on The Everyday Cyclist.

    Like

  30. theeverydaycyclist
    September 25, 2012

    Lovely piece. I’ve yet to make friends with the facsimile transmission machine though I confess to coveting the Emperor’s New Phone. Indeed I send this comment using the Emperor’s slightly time tarnished phone. At two iterations behind the curve, it’s a wonder it works at all.

    My thing is bicycles, at first glance charming, timeless, right first time devices that are immune to the R and D free fall. However each time I visit a bicycle shop I’m roughly cajoled into believing that my 12 month old bike is hopelessly incompatible with modern road conditions, its components devoid of backward compatibility and its colour way (that’s new speak for paint job) hopelessly off trend.

    I salute your efforts with facsimile transmission and your refusal to render it as a verb. Glad you’ve put the whole sorry episode behind you.

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 26, 2012

      Thank you for your commiseration. I hope you take the battle to the bicycle world. I’m right behind you — not on a bicycle, though.

      Like

  31. geeksandtech
    September 26, 2012

    Great post! I enjoyed reading it very much.

    Like

  32. Matthew Wright
    September 26, 2012

    The thing is, what does all this new cool tech give us, really? Other than a headache. I don’t even have a fax. I have a completely dumb cellphone. And we have a phone on the wall. I need the computers because they’re a tool that let me earn money, basically. Do they do the job? Yes. Great. Do I need the latest, or one by Apple, or one that has the latest cool tech, just because it’s cool? No.

    Like

  33. jasondang
    September 26, 2012

    dats very gud

    Like

  34. superbenefitnews
    September 26, 2012

    Yes i can remember first using our new business fax – and each machine feels the same – the unknown…!

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 26, 2012

      I can recognize a giant-leap-for-mankind guy. The Great Unknown — the heavens, stars and the vasty deep. Just faxing lyrical.

      Like

  35. katzideas
    September 26, 2012

    I am surprised people will buy it in a recession…..Madness to me

    Like

  36. lovedesigngreen
    September 26, 2012

    I cant get the smirky smile of my face….. More please : ) Stina

    Like

  37. elroyjones
    September 26, 2012

    Holy shit, Batman! Good for you!

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 26, 2012

      But will you respect me tomorrow?

      Like

      • elroyjones
        September 26, 2012

        I respect the stellar levels of unmitigated adulation you have attained. Who cares where your knickers are, you’ve ARRIVED!

        Like

  38. Simple Sustenance
    September 26, 2012

    What a refreshing article! Loved reading it. Technology has surrounded our lives 24/7. So many gizmos, cords, chargers, constant talking, or glued to computer screens. It is endless noise in our heads but then it does have its benefits as well. The challenge is to maintain balance and find serenity and some quite in simple things around us. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

    Like

  39. Serenity In Nature
    September 26, 2012

    Thanks for a trip down the memory lane…….old typewriters and rotary phones. Anticipation of receiving a note in the mail taught us patience. We live the world of instant gratification now. It has its own beauty though, Well written piece! Look forward to more.

    Like

  40. Samantha
    September 26, 2012

    Nice post 🙂

    I work two jobs, and at one faxes are an everyday occurrence, our vendors fax invoices to us. At my other job, I’ve seen my coworkers fax something once, and they asked, “Who even sends faxes anymore?” The wonders of work technology, yes? Congrats on Freshly Pressed 🙂

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 26, 2012

      It won’t be long before they ask “What’s a fax machine?” Thank you for the comment.

      Like

  41. catcristy
    September 26, 2012

    Great post, I enjoyed it. I am one of those people that sometimes says “a fax what?” I prefer to scan and email, but oh well.
    You know, I was one of those people who thought it was crazy to spend hundreds of dollars on a cell phone, and now I feel as thought I’m becoming “one of those people.” I am so excited to buy the new iphone 5! I “need” an upgrade from my 3gs one, and the camera is so much better on the new iphone. Crazy? Maybe.
    -Cat

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 26, 2012

      We’re all a little crazy in our own ways. What can a person who “needs” a complete collection of Charlie Chan movies say to one needs the latest iPhone. Will it play Charlie Chan movies? Thank you for the comment.

      Like

      • catcristy
        September 26, 2012

        I am sure there’s an app for that 🙂 and yes it will, via Netflix, maybe.
        You are welcome.

        Like

  42. amphomma
    September 26, 2012

    Very clever, and as someone often at enmity with technology, I truly appreciated your feelings about facsimiles. My husband’s favorite thing to pick on me about regarding technology was the night I said something about “rewinding a DVD”. I even wrote a post in my blog about that and my relationship with modernity. I do own an iPhone…and love it. I’ve not mastered downloading music, though, much to my kids’ chagrin. Keep writing!

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 26, 2012

      Thank you. But your husband is justified in picking on you if you don’t know how to rewind a DVD.

      Like

  43. vyvacious
    September 27, 2012

    This tickled my fancy so. I absolutely loved reading your blog post 🙂 How great it must have been to be able to follow such a history of technology instead of having all at your fingertips already. It’s hard for me to imagine a world before cell phones, the internet, and cell phones with data. As much as I love my technology and all its devices, I always look forward to days filled with reading, baking, and eating. I do love my food 😛

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 27, 2012

      A world before cell phones and internet — How on earth did we amuse ourselves? Your Bacon Blue Cheese Guacamole looks delicious. I’ll bet your cell phone can’t cook.

      Like

      • vyvacious
        September 30, 2012

        Thanks!!bu

        No, it most certainly cannot BUT it does help me look up recipes, substitutions, and conversions quickly 😛

        Like

  44. GeekTooGeek
    September 27, 2012

    The first day of my first office job I was asked to send a fax and couldn’t find the fax button on the copy machine. I saw facsimile but never made the connection. Good riddance!

    Like

  45. Alex Jessup
    September 27, 2012

    Reblogged this on Stuff I Think.

    Like

  46. mashwhatable
    September 27, 2012

    Congrats on being freshly pressed and really loved reading this post. It has opened my eyes (presumably locked onto my iPad) in seeing how technology has come so far and will go much further.

    Sent from my iPhone5S

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 27, 2012

      Another showoff. Sent from my ATT black rotary telephone. Thank you for your comment.

      Like

  47. Reverse Engineering
    September 27, 2012

    Still have a VCR, landline, answering machine. The 21st century may be upon us, but that doesn’t mean we have to forget about the past.

    Like

  48. allindigital
    September 27, 2012

    Reblogged this on All In Digital and commented:
    Great post!

    Like

  49. SB
    September 28, 2012

    Reblogged this on Under The Radar.

    Like

  50. mdprincing
    September 28, 2012

    ahhh memories of technology past. Rotary dial phones and long cords on a wall phone so you could whisper to your girlie around the corner thinking your mother couldn’t hear.

    Like

  51. theleadsinger
    September 28, 2012

    I canot get on with touch screen technology at all one little wrong movement with your finger can go from sending a message to going off the screen opening some random app or setting. I’ll just stick to my cheap 10 quid phone thanks 😀

    Like

    • Richard Daybell
      September 30, 2012

      Really, why would anyone want to touch a screen. I don’t know how cheap a 10-quid phone is, but it sounds really cheap.

      Like

  52. llerosablog
    September 30, 2012

    Hahahahah Hilarious post!

    Like

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Technology Is Running Amok

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